Is Going on Safari Dangerous? Your Safety Questions Answered

Is Going on Safari Dangerous? Your Safety Questions Answered

Is going on safari dangerous? If you spend time on the Internet, then you may have come across videos of safari attacks on humans by animals. You may even have read or heard grizzly stories about tourists killed in African safaris. Of course, this can raise concerns about ticking off this bucket list adventure.

Feeling concerned or fearful about safety on safari is natural. After all, you’d be venturing into the vast wilderness (likely with companions), where dangerous beasts roam free, and there have been accidents. That being said, the experience isn’t nearly as hazardous as some would have you believe.

Is Going on Safari Dangerous?

Whenever human beings expose themselves to wild, unrestrained animals in nature, there will always be an element of danger. This is partly what makes safari expeditions exciting. However, on safaris in Africa, game reserves take every precaution to ensure the safety of guests during game drives and walks.

The key to remaining safe on game drives and safari walks is to listen to your safari guide. This is of great importance, as not following instructions can result in accidents and injuries. Respect your surroundings and the fact that you are in the wild. Do this and you will enjoy a safe, unforgettable experience.

Do Animals Attack Safari Vehicles?

Wild animals rarely attack or even approach or acknowledge safari vehicles. They are used to the traffic of safari-goers and have adapted to seeing them outdoors. When animals do approach the trucks, it usually because they are seeking shade or camouflage for prey that they are stalking for food.

Now, is going on safari dangerous? It can be, but it seldom is. Safari trucks and tourists are scenery to bush animals, and safari game rangers are experienced and well trained. Should an animal approach, then your driver will tell you how to behave (close windows, sit, stand, etc.) and interact with it.

is going on safari dangerous

An African rhino doing his thing as safari tourists look on.

What Is the Safari Death Rate?

It is quite difficult to find information related to fatal safari incidents. This is because all deaths caused by wild animals in Africa are categorised into one group. The deaths that do occur normally do not involve tourists, though. They involve locals and villagers while farming and going about their daily lives.

Deaths that have occurred while on safari are very few, so few that they do not even feature on country statistics for safari destinations. Every year, millions of people go safariing in Africa. On average, perhaps one tourist dies as a result of harmful interactions with wild animals in the bushveld.

What Is the Most Dangerous Animal on Safaris?

Lions, leopards, elephants, rhinos, hippos and buffalo… You’ll encounter them all in Africa, depending on when and where you go, and they can all be dangerous. The biggest threat to your health and life, however, is not a member of the Big Five or some other large creature. Rather, it is the pesky mosquito.

Although the tiny mosquito looks far less impressive than Africa’s many sizeable beasts, it can be extremely dangerous. Mozzies carry many potentially deadly diseases, including malaria. The good news is that the risk of contraction is miniscule. Moreover, bites can be prevented if you know what to wear on safari.

is going on safari dangerous

The most deadly animal (insect) in Africa, the mosquito!

Is It Safe to Go on Safari?

So then, is going on safari dangerous or is it safe to go on a safari in Africa? African safaris, if you plan well and follow the rules, are not only safe but also incredibly enjoyable. It’s an experience you won’t soon forget, and statistically, you are much safer on safari than you are driving to work in the mornings.

For more information regarding safety on safaris, particularly safaris in South Africa, you can contact Safaris Down South here. You may also want to check out our other safari blogs.

Sharing is caring!

Add a comment

*Please complete all fields correctly

Related Blogs